Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
Birth to 20 Years

M. Melamedoff, MD, FAAP
N. Tellechea, MD, FAAP

380 N. Broadway
Suite L-2
Jericho, NY 11753

Telephone: 516.931.1776
Fax: 516.942.1940

When to Call a Doctor

Fever | Vomiting | Diarrhea | Respiratory | Poison | Emergency |
More Resources


This is just a guide of when to call a doctor when common
symptoms or conditions arise. This is not a complete list.
If you have questions, please call us.

Fever
Rectal temperature +100.4 F
Normal body temperature 97 - 100 F

Fever is a body's normal response to infection.
Teething does not cause fever.
Fever associated with viral illnesses usually ranges from 101 -104
degrees F and lasts for 3 to 5 days.
The height of the fever does not relate to the seriousness of the
illness.
How sick the child looks is more important than the level of fever.

Call immediately if:

* your child is less than 2 months of age.
* fever is above 105 degrees F.
* your child is crying inconsolably, is difficult to awaken, is confused
or delirious.
* your child has a seizure.
* your child has a stiff neck ( can not touch his chin to his chest )
* your child is breathing with difficulty after the nose is cleared.
* your child is acting very sick.
* your child has a medical condition that puts him at risk for serious infection.
* your child has a severe headache.

Call during office hours if:

* your child is more than 2 months of age.
* fever is between 102 - 105 degrees F.
* burning or pain during urination.
* your child complains of earache.
* your child has a sore throat.
* fever has been present for more than 72 hours.
* your child has a history of febrile seizures.
* you have any other questions.


Vomiting

Spitting up is a natural occurrence, especially during the first year
of life.
Vomiting may be associated with a variety of illnesses, however,
most vomiting results from viral infections which are short lived and
not serious.

Call immediately if:

* your child is less than 2 months of age.
* the vomitus is green or has blood in it.
* your child can not tolerate small amounts of clear fluids.
* your child has signs of dehydration:

-does not cry with tears
-mouth is dry
-has not urinated for 8 - 12 hours
-eyes are sunken
-breath smells fruity

* your child is difficult to awaken, is confused or delirious.
* your child has significant abdominal pain or is unable to walk.
* your child has hives and swelling of the face.

Call during office hours if:

* your child can not tolerate solid foods/formula after 24 hours.
* your child complains of a sore throat.
* your child complains of abdominal pain.
* you have other questions.


Diarrhea

There are many infectious and non infectious causes of diarrhea.
Viruses are the most common cause of diarrhea in children. Most
episodes subside within 72 hours but can last as long as 7 - 10
days.

Call immediately if:

* your child is less than 2 months of age.
* the stool contains blood or is black and tarry.
* your child is difficult to awaken.
* your child has signs of dehydration.
* your child has severe abdominal pain.

Call during office hours if:

* diarrhea has not improved at all after 72 hours.
* your child is between 2 months and 3 years.
* your child has traveled recently.
* you have other questions.


Respiratory
Cough, wheezing and stridor occur frequently in childhood.

The causes of respiratory tract symptoms are numerous and include:
-the common cold
-asthma
-croup,
-bronchiolitis,
-foreign body aspiration,
-pneumonia,
-sinusitis etc.

It is important to determine the severity of this symptoms and when
to seek medical attention.

Call immediately if:

* your child has labored breathing.
* your child is less than 2 months of age.
* your child's chest is moving rapidly.
* your child's lips are pale or blue.
* your child is unable to drink.
* your child complains of chest or abdominal pain.
* your child vomits in conjunction with the respiratory symptoms.
* your child appears anxious or does not recognize you.

Call during office hours if:

* cough awakens your child from sleep
* cough is prolonged and associated with vomiting
* cough persists more than one week
* nasal congestion persists more than 10 days
* known history of asthma
* cough is associated with exercise
* you have other questions


Poison
Long Island Poison Control Center telephone number (800) 222 - 1222.
Keep this number on or near your phone.

Call them if your child drank:
* oven or drain cleaners
* detergents, bleach, etc
* furniture polish
* medications ( heart, blood pressure drugs, iron, Tylenol, blood thinners etc.)
* perfumes, alcohol, mouthwash, nail glue remover, etc
* insecticides, pesticides
* paints and solvents
* antifreeze
* gasoline, kerosene

Call them if your child ate:
* plants, berries and bulbs (wild mushrooms, Castor bean, Holly berries, philodendron, foxglove, poke-weed etc.)

What to do if swallowed poisons:
Do not give the child anything to eat or drink before calling Poison Control Center (800) 222 - 1222.
Do not make the child throw up or give the ipecac syrup.

Call them if your child inhaled:
* Carbon monoxide

What to do if inhaled poisons:
Get the victim to fresh air right away. Call Poison Control Center
(800) 222 - 1222.

What to do if poison is on the skin:
Remove contaminated clothing and rinse the child's skin with water
for 10 minutes. Call Poison Control Center (800) 222 - 1222.

What to do if poison is in the eye:
Flush the child's eye for 15 minutes using a large cup filled with lukewarm water. Call Poison Control Center (800) 222 - 1222.


More Resources

Long Island Poison and Drug Information Center
http://www.lirpdic.org/

National Capital Poison Center (800) 222 - 1222
http://www.poison.org/


A Division ofAllied Pediatrics

Copyright © 2011 MDKidcare. All Rights Reserved.

Maintained by EBWebsites - Website Project Management
Designed by Incorporating Design, LLC